Attorney General Healey Warns of Coronavirus Scams

By Brendan Fitzpatrick | March 11, 2020

Attorney General Maura Healey is advising Massachusetts residents to be aware of scams that look to take advantage of uncertainty about COVID-19.

Healey said that the state wants consumers to be “vigilant when it comes to fraud and abuse,” and that everyone should protect themselves from potential scams.

Healey suggests to be aware of misleading and false information, and to utilize sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health for updates on coronavirus.

High-priced and low-quality products should be avoided, and vaccinations or other treatments shouldn’t be trusted, as there is still no vaccine for COVID-19.

Anyone who reaches out directly claiming to be an expert on coronavirus should be ignored, as they could be scammers looking for money or personal information.

Links should be double checked before being clicked, and nothing should be opened from an unfamiliar sender. Any potential scams should be reported to the Attorney General’s office.

If residents want to make a donation to a charity focused on addressing coronavirus, they are encouraged to do research on the legitimacy of the organization and to only donate with a check or credit card.

People shouldn’t be pressured into making a donation.

Healey also said that residents should stay at home if they’re sick, consider seeking refunds if travel plans are cancelled, and to reach out to medical providers with health insurance questions.

READ MORE FROM CAPECOD.COM.

By Brendan Fitzpatrick | March 11, 2020

Attorney General Maura Healey is advising Massachusetts residents to be aware of scams that look to take advantage of uncertainty about COVID-19.

Healey said that the state wants consumers to be “vigilant when it comes to fraud and abuse,” and that everyone should protect themselves from potential scams.

Healey suggests to be aware of misleading and false information, and to utilize sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health for updates on coronavirus.

High-priced and low-quality products should be avoided, and vaccinations or other treatments shouldn’t be trusted, as there is still no vaccine for COVID-19.

Anyone who reaches out directly claiming to be an expert on coronavirus should be ignored, as they could be scammers looking for money or personal information.

Links should be double checked before being clicked, and nothing should be opened from an unfamiliar sender. Any potential scams should be reported to the Attorney General’s office.

If residents want to make a donation to a charity focused on addressing coronavirus, they are encouraged to do research on the legitimacy of the organization and to only donate with a check or credit card.

People shouldn’t be pressured into making a donation.

Healey also said that residents should stay at home if they’re sick, consider seeking refunds if travel plans are cancelled, and to reach out to medical providers with health insurance questions.

READ MORE FROM CAPECOD.COM.