Combating the Opioid Crisis

Combating the opioid crisis and helping those struggling and their families has been my top priority since before I took office. It is a public health crisis that has demanded action at every level – from investigating drug companies that contributed to the crisis, to arresting traffickers to get lethal drugs off our streets, to working with the medical community and first responders to help those struggling with addiction, to getting prevention education into schools to stop addiction before it starts.

Five people will die of an overdose today in our state. Dozens more will need lifesaving treatment. This crisis has reached just about every community, neighborhood, and family in Massachusetts.

Thanks to a lot of hard work, the numbers are starting to move in the right direction, but they are still nowhere near good enough. We have to redouble our efforts and I won’t rest until we end this crisis once and for all.

How we’re addressing this crisis:

Ninety percent of adults who are struggling with addiction started using when they were under 18- half of them before they were 15. That’s why prevention education is so critical.

My office teamed up with the GE Foundation to create Project Here, a bold new program that is making substance use prevention education available to every public middle school in Massachusetts.

WHAT IS PROJECT HERE?

Project Here is prevention education we’ve made available to every public middle school in Massachusetts. It’s based around a toolkit that incorporates cutting-edge research about how to keep young people healthy. Through our curriculum, materials, and a support network that connects directly to students, we help young people better understand the risks and consequences of using or experimenting with dangerous substances and empower them to make healthy decisions.

WHY IS PROJECT HERE SO IMPORTANT?

  • Substance use prevention for young people is a huge unmet need in Massachusetts.
  • The problem is that, while lots of schools want to do this kind of prevention training, they just don’t have the resources.
  • Project Here is closing that gap and stopping addiction before it starts.
  • Research shows that schools, parents, and communities can work together to reduce the likelihood that young people will experiment with drugs and alcohol.

If you’re interested in bringing Project Here to your child’s school, please click here to learn more.

The road to addiction and overdose still too often begins with a prescription. That’s why I’m investigating the pharmaceutical industry and working with medical professionals to improve prescribing practices. We need to understand how this crisis happened, and ensure it never happens again.

Earlier this year, my office expanded one of the largest public investigations in American history, a multistate investigation into the marketing and sale of opioids by manufacturers and distributors. We deserve to hear from these drug-makers what they knew about the addictive and deadly nature of opioid painkillers, and whether they misrepresented those risks in order to increase corporate profits. The people of Massachusetts deserve answers, and we’re going to get them.

Over the past four years, our team has:

  • Secured settlements with CVS and Walgreens to ensure pharmacists were reviewing prescriptions to flag problematic patterns, in the process recovering millions for our state and taxpayers.
  • Cracked down on “pill mills” and worked with medical professionals to change prescribing methods.

Together with the Massachusetts State Police and our many partners in law enforcement, we’re going after heroin and fentanyl traffickers and taking down networks across the region to get dangerous drugs off the street. Last year alone, our team pulled 11 million lethal doses of fentanyl off the streets.

Over the past four years, our team has also:

  • Helped to pass a new law together with the Governor and the Legislature, which gave the state important new tools to combat the opioid epidemic.
  • Secured a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to launch a Fentanyl Strike Force.
  • Constantly collaborated with local police departments, U.S. Attorneys Offices and others, not just in Massachusetts, but in states like New Hampshire, talking about cases, sharing strategies, and combining our efforts.

Last year alone, our first responders administered more than 20,000 doses of Narcan, the lifesaving opioid overdose reversal drug. In many cases, those doses saved a life.

Back in 2015, we discovered that the prices for this drug were skyrocketing. That’s why I worked with the Legislature and the Department of Public Health to create a state fund that allows our police departments, firefighters, EMTs, and cities and towns to buy these drugs at a heavily discounted price. This year, I was proud to announce an additional $400,000 will be directed to this fund to ensure this lifesaving work can continue.

That’s why we’ve also called on the business community to support the state fund that helps our communities buy Narcan.

If you or your organization is interested in donating to this fund, please go HERE.

In a public health crisis, we need to make sure that everyone can get the treatment and support they need to recover. Addiction is a disease, and we need to treat it like one.

My office will continue to advocate for more beds and funding for treatment. We want residents to see our office as a resource and encourage anyone in recovery to contact us with questions about ways to obtain treatment.

Over the past four years, our team has:

  • Investigated facilities that fail to provide their advertised treatment to those in recovery.
  • Raised awareness about the Massachusetts 911 Good Samaritan Law which encourages people to call 911 during an overdose emergency.
  • Helped apprise families and those seeking treatment of their possible options and resources. Assisted them in connecting with rehabilitation facilities.

Combating the opioid crisis and helping those struggling and their families has been my top priority since before I took office. It is a public health crisis that has demanded action at every level – from investigating drug companies that contributed to the crisis, to arresting traffickers to get lethal drugs off our streets, to working with the medical community and first responders to help those struggling with addiction, to getting prevention education into schools to stop addiction before it starts.

Ninety percent of adults who are struggling with addiction started using when they were under 18- half of them before they were 15. That’s why prevention education is so critical.

My office teamed up with the GE Foundation to create Project Here, a bold new program that is making substance use prevention education available to every public middle school in Massachusetts.

WHAT IS PROJECT HERE?

Project Here is prevention education we’ve made available to every public middle school in Massachusetts. It’s based around a toolkit that incorporates cutting-edge research about how to keep young people healthy. Through our curriculum, materials, and a support network that connects directly to students, we help young people better understand the risks and consequences of using or experimenting with dangerous substances and empower them to make healthy decisions.

WHY IS PROJECT HERE SO IMPORTANT?

  • Substance use prevention for young people is a huge unmet need in Massachusetts.
  • The problem is that, while lots of schools want to do this kind of prevention training, they just don’t have the resources.
  • Project Here is closing that gap and stopping addiction before it starts.
  • Research shows that schools, parents, and communities can work together to reduce the likelihood that young people will experiment with drugs and alcohol.

If you’re interested in bringing Project Here to your child’s school, please click here to learn more.

The road to addiction and overdose still too often begins with a prescription. That’s why I’m investigating the pharmaceutical industry and working with medical professionals to improve prescribing practices. We need to understand how this crisis happened, and ensure it never happens again.

Earlier this year, my office expanded one of the largest public investigations in American history, a multistate investigation into the marketing and sale of opioids by manufacturers and distributors. We deserve to hear from these drug-makers what they knew about the addictive and deadly nature of opioid painkillers, and whether they misrepresented those risks in order to increase corporate profits. The people of Massachusetts deserve answers, and we’re going to get them.

Over the past four years, our team has:

  • Secured settlements with CVS and Walgreens to ensure pharmacists were reviewing prescriptions to flag problematic patterns, in the process recovering millions for our state and taxpayers.
  • Cracked down on “pill mills” and worked with medical professionals to change prescribing methods.

Together with the Massachusetts State Police and our many partners in law enforcement, we’re going after heroin and fentanyl traffickers and taking down networks across the region to get dangerous drugs off the street. Last year alone, our team pulled 11 million lethal doses of fentanyl off the streets.

Over the past four years, our team has also:

  • Helped to pass a new law together with the Governor and the Legislature, which gave the state important new tools to combat the opioid epidemic.
  • Secured a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to launch a Fentanyl Strike Force.
  • Constantly collaborated with local police departments, U.S. Attorneys Offices and others, not just in Massachusetts, but in states like New Hampshire, talking about cases, sharing strategies, and combining our efforts.

Last year alone, our first responders administered more than 20,000 doses of Narcan, the lifesaving opioid overdose reversal drug. In many cases, those doses saved a life.

Back in 2015, we discovered that the prices for this drug were skyrocketing. That’s why I worked with the Legislature and the Department of Public Health to create a state fund that allows our police departments, firefighters, EMTs, and cities and towns to buy these drugs at a heavily discounted price. This year, I was proud to announce an additional $400,000 will be directed to this fund to ensure this lifesaving work can continue.

That’s why we’ve also called on the business community to support the state fund that helps our communities buy Narcan.

If you or your organization is interested in donating to this fund, please go HERE.

In a public health crisis, we need to make sure that everyone can get the treatment and support they need to recover. Addiction is a disease, and we need to treat it like one.

My office will continue to advocate for more beds and funding for treatment. We want residents to see our office as a resource and encourage anyone in recovery to contact us with questions about ways to obtain treatment.

Over the past four years, our team has:

  • Investigated facilities that fail to provide their advertised treatment to those in recovery.
  • Raised awareness about the Massachusetts 911 Good Samaritan Law which encourages people to call 911 during an overdose emergency.
  • Helped apprise families and those seeking treatment of their possible options and resources. Assisted them in connecting with rehabilitation facilities.
2018-05-30T16:52:28+00:00