We need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable

By Maura Healey | May 29, 2020

I’m heartbroken by the murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. And I’m angry. What I can’t get out of my mind is the complicity of the officers who watched George die, but did nothing. These killers – all of them – must be charged to the full extent of the law.

The sad truth is that this complicity is everywhere. It’s present in the killings of Black people across this country. It’s present in the anti-Asian violence we’ve seen spike during this pandemic. It’s present in communities like Chelsea that have long been underserved and now are paying the steepest price. It’s present in our failure to provide basic protections for workers of color.

There’s a lot of work to be done – policies to pass, poverty to alleviate, Presidents to remove. My team and I are going to continue working day and night to be a part of the solution. But the responsibility – the obligation – to do more, to do better, is on white people.

We need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. We need to do some serious introspection, and that introspection must result in behavior change.

We’re all capable of racism. And we’re all capable of anti-racism. It’s not enough to simply say, “I’m not racist.” What are you doing to actively stand up against racism and support targeted communities?

Here’s a good place to start. Sarah Sophie Flicker and Alyssa Klein put together these anti-racism resources for white people. Please read this, share this, and take action in your own community.

To my Black constituents, colleagues, friends – I want you to know that this office will fight like hell for you. I know you feel the acute pain of so many slights, in school, stores, streets, driving, work, and so on. Our office must walk alongside you in those spaces.

By Maura Healey | May 29, 2020

I’m heartbroken by the murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. And I’m angry. What I can’t get out of my mind is the complicity of the officers who watched George die, but did nothing. These killers – all of them – must be charged to the full extent of the law.

The sad truth is that this complicity is everywhere. It’s present in the killings of Black people across this country. It’s present in the anti-Asian violence we’ve seen spike during this pandemic. It’s present in communities like Chelsea that have long been underserved and now are paying the steepest price. It’s present in our failure to provide basic protections for workers of color.

There’s a lot of work to be done – policies to pass, poverty to alleviate, Presidents to remove. My team and I are going to continue working day and night to be a part of the solution. But the responsibility – the obligation – to do more, to do better, is on white people.

We need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. We need to do some serious introspection, and that introspection must result in behavior change.

We’re all capable of racism. And we’re all capable of anti-racism. It’s not enough to simply say, “I’m not racist.” What are you doing to actively stand up against racism and support targeted communities?

Here’s a good place to start. Sarah Sophie Flicker and Alyssa Klein put together these anti-racism resources for white people. Please read this, share this, and take action in your own community.

To my Black constituents, colleagues, friends – I want you to know that this office will fight like hell for you. I know you feel the acute pain of so many slights, in school, stores, streets, driving, work, and so on. Our office must walk alongside you in those spaces.

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